Of Mice and Lawyers – more wire chewing woes

Well, I have been trying to tell people about this problem for a while now. It seems that some consumers are fed up and have turned to the law to protest the use of tasty soy based wiring in their vehicles. . .

CALIFORNIA — Do you have warning lights and costly car repairs? Rodent damage could be the culprit behind your next break down. A class action lawsuit claims the type of plastic used in new cars could be attracting vermin that eat the wires.

“I never could figure out where the stuff came from until I saw the rat,” said Barbara Olm. On more than one occasion a tiny hitch hiker made a meal out of the wiring in Olm’s 2012 Lexus.

The 84-year-old poisoned one rat in her car, but not before the rodent cause more than $400 in damage. “The mechanic found a ground wire and coolant wire eaten by rats,” Olm said. . . . .

Chewed up insulation is a cheap fix but wiring damage can be costly. “I have seen a couple in the $2000 range,” Campanili said, and damage is not covered under warrantee. University Honda can’t explain what’s attracts rodents to vehicles, but attorney Brian Kabateck can. “The plastic coating around the wires is made of soy,” Kabateck said. “I am not a rat expert, but soy must be delicious to rats.”

“While we cannot comment on this litigation, we can say that rodent damage to vehicle wiring occurs across the industry, and the issue is not brand- or model-specific.” Victor Vanov Corporate Communications Toyota Motor North America

http://www.wcpo.com/money/consumer/dont-waste-your-money/lawsuit-claims-car-wiring-too-tasty-to-rodents

 

 

Car owners across the country are getting into their cars these days, turning the key and finding their engine won’t start. The reason may be hard to believe: an animal ate their car’s wiring.

Now, a class action lawsuit claims millions of Toyota cars, trucks and SUVs contain wiring that is attractive to animals like squirrels and mice. Honda settled a similar suit a few years ago.

Thousands of car owners in recent years have ended up like Woody and Mary Herald, who two years ago showed us how animals chewed through their car’s wiring. “On the ground we found this connector, with six inches of wire on either end of it, that the varmints had chewed into completely,” Woody Herald said.

This new suit claims Toyota uses soy-based wiring, which is environmentally friendly but tasty to animals. . . . . .

http://fox17online.com/2017/02/08/do-animals-think-your-car-wiring-is-tasty/

While taking on the auto giants may be an option, it is likely to take lots of time before something is resolved. In the mean time, what is to be done for the average person who is stuck with a rodent taking up residence in their engine and feasting on their car wires?

 “If you see any evidence of rodents under the hood of your car, you should buy a 384250_f1024repellent immediately, before they cause  hundreds of dollars of damage.  That way, you don’t waste your money.”

 http://fox17online.com/2017/02/08/do-animals-think-your-car-wiring-is-tasty/

Well, I have never been one to bring up a problem without offering a solution.   Our PeeShots are perfect for this application. They come in an 8 pack and are “Pee-Loaded” with PredatorPee. Remove the lids and place the PeeShots near each tire and in engine compartment or other target areas in the vehicle. Remove before driving. Choose BobcatPeeShots for mice, CoyotePeeShots for rats and ‘coons, FoxPeeShots for squirrels, and WolfPeeShots for domestic and feral cats.

Problem: Predatory Hawks – Solution: Hawk Stopper

“. . .as a backyard chicken owner I hated to see my chickens killed. I wanted to know exactly how to protect chickens from hawks. The red-tailed hawk is one of three species in the United States known as a chicken hawk. The other two are sharp shinned and Cooper’s hawks.” How to protect chickens from hawks Pam Freeman

hawkUnfortunately, this chicken keeper’s experience is all too common. Hawks are a real threat to free range poultry across the country and with a rise in the number of backyard chickens, it is a problem begging for a solution.  Some people resort to shooting these birds right out of the sky. Well, aside from it being needless killing, this is also illegal without proper permitting.

“ All hawks and owls are federally protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 USC, 703-711). These laws strictly prohibit the capture, killing, or possession of hawks or owls without special permit.”

In addition to this fact, “No repellents or toxicants are registered or recommended for controlling hawk or owl damage. In years past, raptors were killed by putting out carcasses laced with poison. This practice led to the indiscriminate killing of many nontarget animals. Concerns for human safety also prompted the banning of toxicants for raptor control.”(http://icwdm.org/handbook/birds/HawksOwls.asp)

So, what is a chicken keeper faced with this ongoing threat to do?

Well, that is what the creative folks at predatorpee.com have been researching for the past few years. And the result of those efforts have produced the Hawk Stopper – visual deflection net.

The concept was first used to protect salt-water salmon farms in the Gulf of Maine from predatory sea birds. Hawk Stopper now uses the same principles of visual deflection to protect free-range chickens, turkeys and ducks as well as koi, catfish and other inland pond or farm-raised fish.
How does Hawk Stopper work? When you call someone eagle eye, it’s because they have sharp eyesight. But in reality, no human’s eyesight comes even close to the visual capabilities of predatory raptors like hawks, eagles and falcons. These birds see about 8 times better than humans – they see things sharper and from a greater distance than anything we can imagine. Hawk Stopper uses the hawks’ incredible eyesight to turn an easy-to-handle, inexpensive, lightweight 1500 square foot mesh into a formidable and impenetrable barrier. What we see as almost invisible looks to hawk like jail cell door!

A peaceful, easy solution that will keep your hens safe and not harm the hawks either. It’s a win-win.

 

Ask the PeeMan: Raucous Raccoons?

It has been a loong time. Summer slump – but the air is cooling and it is time for the PeeMan to get bloggin’ again! We will start with a tidbit from my PeeMail . . .

Question:

Hello,

> I have raccoons frequently pooing in my backyard and especially on my deck. I have kids. How safe is coyote urine? Can it be sprayed on decks? Can it also be sprayed on grass? How do I apply it and how often should I apply it? My backyard is roughly 45 x 30 feet. Raccoon

> How long does it take to ship coyote urine to Canada?  I live in . . .  I understand shipping is free.

> Thanks

Answer:

Figure about a week to Canada – shipping is quick, but customs works on their own timeframe. For a deck, use with our ScentTags or 33Day Dispensers – I wouldn’t recommend drinking PredatorPee but it is non-toxic.

KJ The PeeMan

Urine for Human Pests? Nope – Skunk’Um!

My wife thinks that I make stuff up. She thinks that some of my ideas are only great in my mind. Well, granted, a few of my ideas haven’t panned out exactly as I may have hoped(that’s for another post) but a question I received from a clever customer this week confirms that the invention of Skunk’Um is a great solution for a real problem. The fact that we have sold hundreds of bottles since it launched doesn’t hurt either. Without further ado . . . it is Ask The PeeMan Wednesday!

Q. I am curious which is the absolute worst smelling urine of all the ones you sell? I am looking for something to spray/place outside my bedroom window to deter people from loitering so I am able to get some sleep at night so I guess my predator would be human.
> Thank you, Amy

 

A. Amy,

Sorry for the delay – its our crazy season. See Skunk’um – for annoying people at this link: http://www.predatorpeestore.com/skunk-um.html

KJ The PeeMan

As you can see from my response, I have been a little delinquent in responding to my peemail lately. Shipping pee during the busy season and keeping up with the summer farm chores has kept me away my keyboard. Never fear, if you ask the PeeMan a question he will answer – just not as quickly in May, June and July!

Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan

 

Ask the PeeMan: California Skunks

Hi there, we live just outside of San Diego, California in a little town.  We used to smell skunks once in a while but it’s getting very bad lately.  I came across your website and I’m a little confused which predator pee is best for skunks – would you recommend the fox pee granules?   We have some plants clustered together and it seems like they like to go in there, could we just spread the granules in that area and call it good?   Although it says the granules are recommended for burrowing creatures, should they work for skunks too.  How often do you think we would need to reapply?  Anyway, any guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Shelly

 

skunk6

Shelly,

Yes FoxPee Granules would work fine – skunks like to dig for grubs etc. Reapply after rain – which I understand is not so frequent in So California. Here is the link:

Ask the PeeMan: HawkStopper Questions

Wednesday is Ask the PeeMan day!

Those of you who are familiar with the blog will  remember that a couple of months ago, my company launched the HawkStopper product. For so many years, we had people asking if we had anything for birds. Well, birds don’t have much of a sense of smell, so predatorpee wasn’t the solution for them. Now predatory birds have to think twice about attacking chickens because of HawkStopper – visual deflection net.

Q. What is it made of and what is its life span?  Also, what are the length/width dimensions of the 1500 sq ft package?  Thanks! Susan

 

A.Susan,
HawkStopper is made of three strands of white nylon filaments twisted together to hawkstopper-visual-deflection-logo-900form a single strand of twine with a bonded coating that keeps the netting white and flexible.  Should last at least 5 years. Here is the link:
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/hawk-stopper.html
KJ The PeeMan

Rodents Cause More Than £370m Of Damage Annually To Cars in the UK Alone

Guest Blogger Toby Bateson

Rats are renowned for being highly destructive. They are well known to damage food, clothing and buildings. roof-rat-961499_640They also target machines and computers, including the wiring in your car engine. Repairs can be expensive, sometimes an entire car may need rewiring as a result. For a high end sports car or SUV this can be in the region of £7000.

car-482683_640Research by Hammer Technologies has shown that an amazing 9% of car users in the UK have had their car damaged by rodents at some point. Damage found included chewed pipes, bitten plastic cowling and broken wires and pipes.

The reason they tend to do this is thought to be because their teeth grow constantly throughout their lives. They chew on hard materials such as steel wires in order to wear their teeth down. The warm engines of cars are also thought to attract rats looking for a home.

The survey demonstrated that the average cost of repair came to £300. The total cost of rat damage to cars every year was calculated to be an amazing £377,410,90.

The way this figure was found, if you are interested, is as follows.

In 2013 31 million cars were on the road in the UK, according to official Department of Transport figures. The survey showed an average of 1.86 rat damage events for each person who was affected. Eight of the 33 episodes reported occurred in the previous year.

9% of those surveyed had suffered rodent damage to their cars. The following sum calculates the total cost of the damage. 9% * 31 million cars * £300 * 1.86 episodes per person * (8÷33) episodes in the last year = £377,410,909.

If you have a car make sure you do everything you can to protect yourself. The PeeMan has products which will protect your car from rat damage.  Visit the store  now to get the protection you need.