NEWSFLASH: Using Wolf Urine Works to Deter Coyotes – KTVN 2 News

gray-wolf-head-canis-lupus-436x544Of course we’ve known our 100% Wolf Pee is an effective deterrent against coyotes for years, but it is always nice to have some independent confirmation. Check out this story from a local tv station in the Reno-Sparks, NV area – and don’t worry it is not FAKE NEWS.

“There are a few ways to deter wildlife from coming onto your property. Here in Reno-Sparks, many are trying to keep coyotes out of their yards.

Wolf urine is one of the most widely-used deterrents in our area, according to Michael Beran, Owner and Operator of Wildlife Command Center. Beran says that’s in part because people can order it online and in large amounts.

So how does it work? It plays off of their animal instincts. Bill Chamberlain, Director of the United States Wolf Refuge in Reno, says, “Their sense of smell, their sense of hearing is so intuitive, that the scent of wolf urine lays out the scent of an adversary.” Beran adds, “That instinct is very, very effective against a female coyote, especially one that’s thinking about, or is, denning.”

Therefore, if the coyote lurking around your home is a female, then wolf urine would likely do the trick. But, when it comes to the male, especially urban coyotes like we see in our area, it likely won’t be effective. Beran explains, “He’s never experienced the wolf, so he doesn’t know the threat, and so he’s just not as afraid.”

However, if your curiosity is piqued and you’re looking for a non-lethal option to keep coyotes at bay, you may think it’s worth the try–especially if you’re unsure if it’s a male or female coyote, or perhaps both, near your neighborhood.

If you do try it, Beran says the application process is important.  Always squirt the product on a fence or pole–above the height of your knee. He explains, “The higher that lift is, the bigger an animal thinks that predator is. Apply the urine to all major posts or fences along your yard, similar to a wolf marking its territory.

Now for the million dollar question: How do companies collect the urine?

It comes from wolves living in preserves and kennels with special flooring. Those floors have collection troughs underneath, so when they urinate, it goes into that trough, where manufacturers are able to collect and process it.

Beran says, if raccoons are your problem, wolf urine is a completely effective deterrent in that case.

We’d like to point out that the U.S. Wolf Refuge in Reno shown in this story does not collect their wolves’ urine. PredatorPee is one of many wolf urine sellers available online. To check them out, click here.

If you’d like to learn more about the refuge, which houses more than a dozen wolves and runs completely off of donations, click here.

To learn more about coyote removal efforts and prevention, click here. ”

By Elizabeth Olveda

http://www.ktvn.com/story/37299694/using-wolf-urine-to-deter-coyotes-does-it-work

(As an aside, our long term experience with the predator-prey instinct principle has demonstrated time and again that the fear is instinctual and not based on exposure to the predator, therefore, in this case,  the wolf urine works to deter both male and female coyotes)

Until I find more words(my own or others’) . . .The PeeMan

Ask the PeeMan: Will it bother my dog?

Now back to our our regularly scheduled Wednesday’s Ask The PeeMan. This week features a question that I get frequently, so frequently in fact that I decided to include two examples. People are invariably concerned about the effect of PredatorPee on Fido or Fiffi or Buster . . .

Q. How will Wolf urine affect our dog. We are trying to keep cats off our property. Thanks. Dongray_and_white_terrier_looking_up

Q. We just ordered Coyote Pee to protect our yard from raccoons.  Will this coyote urine cause a problem with our domesticated dog?  He plays in the yard all the time.  Please advise.  Lorraine

 

A. No, your dog might be a bit curious, but that is all.
KJ The PeeMan

I love it when I can give a simple answer! No need to fear for your beloved dog.

Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan

Ask The PeeMan: Deer, Deer and MORE Deer

Wednesday means Ask the PeeMan – the weekly feature where The PeeMan shares questions that real customers have asked and provides his pee-rrific answers.
‘Evening-

I live in a lovely Gorham neighborhood, in the last house on a dead-end street, surrounded by woods.  For five years, I’ve had only occasional problems with deer but this year — after the lightest winter in history, go figure — it seems the word is out.  Deer are coming right up to my family room windows and have stripped a yew, a holly, and two arborvitae.  These are… *ahem* were well-established plants that have survived harsh winters and two big, rowdy dogs, so it broke my heart to see them defoliated.  I generally have a live-and-let-live attitude about these things but in this instance, there are plenty of other nutrients in the immediate area, so I didn’t see the humor AT ALL.

My question is this: there are quite a few coyotes in the surrounding area and the deer don’t seem to be in the least perturbed by their presence (or mine, or that of my loud German Shepherd).  Does this mean that I should consider using, say, wolf urine instead of coyote urine?  My personal preference would be a flame-thrower but I’m pretty sure there’s a municipal code that prohibits it… regrettably.

By the way, I came to your website by way of my vet’s recommendation.  She has chickens and relies on your products to keep them safe, which I thought was a wonderful endorsement.

Thanks in advance,

Cynthia
Cynthia,
With coyotes in the neighborhood, we do recommend going with WolfPee. It has the added benefit of not only keeping the deer away, but the coyotesherten-5 too! Here is the direct link. Thanks for finding us…send me the name of your vet, so I can thank her.
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/wolf-urine.html

KJ The PeeMan

Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan

Thoughts on the Coyote Problem

Greetings! Winter returned in a big way up here with a foot of freshly fallen snow and arctic air right on its heels. Good day for bloggin’

Over 30 years ago, when we first pioneered the use of Predator Urine to control animal pests; the big animal problem in the U.S was deer.  The spread of suburbia into the rural areas of the country coupled with more restrictive hunting laws caused the deer herds to expand and discover new gourmet menu choices amidst the suburban lawns and gardens. Deer no longer had to struggle to find food when a veritable smorgasbord of delights awaited them within and easy amble. Cedar hedges, ornamental shrubs, garden vegetables, and the low-hanging fruit of those pretty little dwarf apple trees.

And, alas, the homeowners were not amused and the use of Predator Urine  as a deterrent was born. COYOTEPROBSBut, the homeowners were not the only ones who noticed the expansion of the deer herd. Coyotes took notice. Over the last 30 years we have been able to watch the way nature always works to stay in balance. I see this as evidence of God’s perfect design, others see it differently. But no matter how you see it, you must admit it is a wonder to observe.

Where there were once few people and the deer struggled to survive became places where people live and work and deer exceed the capacity of the landscape.  Now, enter the coyote. The coyote has made its presence known in a big way throughout the urban and suburban landscape of the U.S.

Now, 30 years later, the biggest pest facing homeowners in America is the coyote and once again the PeeMan has the answer. PredatorPee® WolfPee is now the biggest selling PredatorPee® product in the American market.  But don’t take my word for it, just check out what’s come to my PeeMail inbox:

“…After we bought your WolfPee last year, we did not have any problems with coyotes whatsoever and we thank you for that. New year and we have three cats we must protect. I thank you and will place my large order soon…”

Margery F. Walpole, MA

“I believe this is my third purchase from you, and it seems to be deterring the coyotes, so I’m going to continue hanging it on my fence to keep them at bay, from my doggies.”

Susanne – Denver, CO

“Predator Pee has worked and I have become your loyal customer. Your service is prompt and accurate!”

Kathy – Livingston, NJ

“I have been ordering the wolf pee from you for a couple years now…There is no one else who does what you do!”

Laurie – Corrales, NM

“It really works…we haven’t seen a coyote in the neighborhood for years now.”

Nancy – Woodinville, WA

But it is not only our customers that have discovered that WolfPee works for Coyotes. In largest study of urban coyotes ever conducted, researchers working with Stan Gehrt, an assistant professor at Ohio State University found that wolf urine  worked successfully to kept coyotes out of a yard. Wolves were at one time natural enemies of the coyotes.

And even celebrities like Kristen Ritter are talking about it. Here is what she had to say on Conan.

This just makes me ponder: “What will be next?”

Until I find more words(or the next big pest). . .The PeeMan

 

 

 

 

Guest Blogger – P. Catcher

I have noticed some blogs have famous guest bloggers share their thoughts from time to time. So, I figured I would try to get one myself. I did and he is certainly one of a kind. Enjoy. . .

How I became a Urine Collector

By P. Catcher

When I applied for the job, I was looking for a ground floor opportunity and I found it. The ad I responded to read something like this: Looking for adventure? Work closely with wild animals in their natural environment. Great health, accident and death benefits. Athletic flexibility a plus. Uniforms provided. Ground floor opportunity with potential for fast movement. Call for interview. Now, I was curious. This sounded like just the job I was looking for. I called for the interview and made the appointment. The address was on a dead-end road about 10 miles out from town. The office was rustic in a pleasant sort of way. But, the first thing I noticed was the smell. It wasn’t strong or overpowering, but it was everywhere. The receptionist was pleasant and made the normal small-talk that receptionists make with applicants for “ground floor opportunities”. Soon I was ushered into a large conference room populated by stuffed mounts of snarling coyotes, wolves, bobcats and foxes. With eight pairs of sightless eyes boring into me from all sides, I was more than a little uncomfortable. The door opened and a huge bearded man entered. The room suddenly became much smaller. As I took his meaty hand, I wondered if this same hand played an active role in the fate of the critters adorning the walls of the room. Mr. Henderson explained that his company was in the waste recycling business and need help in processing the waste materials and readying them for their new markets. “Excuse me, Mr. Henderson, but I thought this job had something to do with wild animals in the great outdoors, not waste recycling. Am I at the right place?” I said. “Yes, Mr. Catcher, you are in the right place. Come with me and I think it will become clearer,” said Mr. Henderson with a slight grin on his face. He took me down outside towards a long, low building. I noticed by now that I had become quite used to the smell, but it was definitely getting stronger as we approached the building. We entered through a steel door into a clean room with white walls and bright light. Along the walls hung large heavy-looking overalls and on a shelf were stacks of long rubber gloves with thick leather cuffs. On a rack above were rows of headgear that looked like a cross between a welders hood and an NFL helmet. A row of rubber overshoes lined the base of the wall. “Let’s suit up,” said Henderson. I was a little wary now, but I picked out a suit that looked about my size and began to put it on. It was much lighter than it looked, but thick and well padded. The helmet was light also with a mesh face protector that provided excellent peripheral vision. The gloves allowed for surprising dexterity and the boots provided great traction. I watched Mr. Henderson finish suiting up. He now appeared superhuman in size and power. I supposed I couldn’t get into too much trouble with him around. Henderson purposefully walked to the far end of the room, released a deadbolt and opened the door. He motioned for me to be quiet and follow. The door opened outside into a lightly wooded area. I could see high fences enclosed the perimeter. Large water tanks stood next to the building with spigots that emptied into a low trough camouflaged to look like a stream. I looked around. Even though I couldn’t be sure, I had the distinct impression that we were not alone. “Look over there behind that pine tree,” whispered Mr. Henderson. My eyes scanned over towards the pine tree. I saw nothing at first, but gradually my eyes separated a distinctive shape from the background. It was a coyote. I recognized it from those public TV National Geographic specials. “Watch this,” said Mr. Henderson. He went over to two tree stumps. Big twin maples that had long ago been cut down. Each stump was about 2 feet in diameter. He reached down, grabbed some sort of handle and pulled. Instantly the tops of the stumps popped up like lids on a hinged trash cans. I glanced back and saw the coyote start to move. I looked into the stump and could not believe my eyes. bottle“Beer nuts and popcorn, they love ’em,” said Henderson. Henderson backed slowly away from the stumps and as he did I saw the woods come alive with movement. First the coyote by the pine tree began warily circling towards the stumps. The stumps were rigged up somehow to pump the beer nut and popcorn up and out like mini volcanoes. Soon the coyotes were coming from everywhere. Henderson moved slowly over to the tanks and opened the spigot and flow bubbled into the fake stream bed. But, it wasn’t water. It was gold and frothy and soon a familiar scent reached me. “That’s right Catcher, it’s beer. This is Pabst Blue Ribbon and a little past its freshness date. They like it all right, but you ought to seem ’em when they get into some Red Dog,” offered Henderson. I was almost stupefied by the drama unfolding in front of me, but my time as a mere spectator was to be short-lived. “Grab that flat-pan,” instructed Henderson as he pointed to a long-handled pan hanging from the wall. The flat-pan looked like an extended pizza paddle with a bed-pan shaped container instead of a flat blade. The handle was a good four feet long, hollow like a tube and connected to a coiled clear hose. As I got a grip on the pan, I watched the coyotes gorge themselves on the beer nuts and popcorn. Soon a few started backing away from the feed and start sniffing around. They started moving towards the stream of beer. “That stuff makes ’em wicked thirsty, they’ll be hitting the brew in a minute,” said Henderson as his eyes followed the pack, “get ready with that pan. You see, Catcher, we recycle wild animal urine. People use it for all kinds of reasons and they pay a lot for it. Your job is to collect it.” “Urine Collector,” I thought, “so that’s what the ad meant when it said ‘work closely with wild animals in their natural environment.'” I watched as the coyotes approached the stream. Henderson was right, they sure were thirsty. “They won’t stop drinking ’till I turn off the spigot. Kinda like the boys down at the Silver Spur. Now this is what you do. Take the pan and get down on your belly and sneak up behind them. As long as the beer tap is open, they won’t bother you. Get about 5 feet behind them, and slide the pan under the business end one of ’em. They’ll start peein’ soon, so be ready. They usually don’t all go at once, so should be able to handle quite a few by yourself . The hose on the handle is connected to a pump, so it’ll take all you can get. By the time we get a full crew hired, we ought to be able to get the whole herd at the same time. Now, collecting from the females is pretty simple, but with the males, it gets kinda tricky. They shoot off to one side or another and it gets worse after they’ve been in the beer for awhile. But, with practice you’ll rarely lose a drop,” instructed Henderson. I looked at the line-up of coyote tails and then looked for the door which Henderson had now fully blocked. I could tell my ground floor opportunity was about to begin. Down I went, pan in hand, and began slithering towards the coyotes. Coyotes look different from that angle. As I got closer, I extended the pan. “Close, get closer,” urged Henderson. I finally got the pan into position just as the flow began. The first was a female and it was a good shot. The male next to her took a little extra wrist action, but again I was successful. I could feel the urine coursing through the handle and into the hose and back to a holding tank concealed somewhere inside the building. In about 5 minutes, I must have collected a gallon or more. Judging from his exuberant body language, Mr. Henderson seemed to be quite pleased. One after another, I positioned my pan in the right spot and then began the subtle moves necessary to catch every last drop. It was more of a dance than anything and I was really getting into it, but then it happened. I should have been more careful, but I was just a beginner. I had my pan in position under a particularly large male, but just as he lifted his left leg he lost his balance on his right momentarily. A little too much Pabst, I suppose. I moved my pan quickly to compensate…..a little to quickly, I’m afraid. I whacked him good on a particularly sensitive part of the male anatomy. The sensation is something no female can comprehend, but as soon as it happened, I felt that coyote’s pain as much as if it was my own. There was no amount of beer that could distract that coyote from what had just occurred. I want to tell you that there is nothing quite like the feeling of being eye-ball to eye-ball with an 60# male coyote than has just had his bells rung. I now appreciated the copy in the rest of the original help wanted ad which read “Great health, accident and death benefits. Athletic flexibility a plus.” As I scrambled to my feet, the coyote took aim and lunged. He would have nailed me if I hadn’t tripped over the urine hose and toppled head long into the beer trough. I regained my footing and scrambled towards the door. Henderson was already on the other side peering out with the door cracked open. I could immediately tell what a warm, sensitive and caring boss he was as I heard him yell, “Shut off the beer, we’re wasting it!” I reached the door with 3 half-drunk coyotes in staggering pursuit. Fortunately, they couldn’t quite coordinate an effective attack and tripped all over each other in their failed attempt to kill me. I made it through the door just inches ahead of a coyote snout. Inside the door, I slumped to the floor. I couldn’t believe what I had just been through. I smelled like a barroom bathroom on Saturday night and looked like a deflated sumo wrestler. Henderson was beaming. “Not bad, son. The last couple of guys weren’t quite as agile as you are. The job is yours. You are a natural,” gushed Henderson. “You are a natural” No one had ever said that to me before. With renewed strength and pride, I pulled myself to my feet and shook Henderson’s outstretched hand.

Until I find more words. . .(my own or someone else’s). The PeeMan

Pee-blicity! – Juvenile humor & Capitalism

I just recently stumbled upon the article below. Finally! A journalist who actually gets me. Honestly, I couldn’t have asked for a better write up about our company, Maine Outdoors Solutions LLC. My wife and daughters especially enjoyed the “juvenile” humor comment, and “exemplifies the essential vigor of capitalism” is just about the nicest thing anyone has ever said about me.

Thanks so much Jayson!

Enjoy the article . . .I certainly did!

A pressing problem: Which urine protects best?

By Jayson Jacoby/The Baker City Herald September 18, 2015 01:58 pm

Should I douse my wife’s garden with the urine of a wolf or a cougar?

As you can imagine, this conundrum is cutting into my sleep.

Nor are my choices, in the realm of liquid produce protection, limited to apex carnivores.

Maybe I can confuse as well as frighten the tomato-gobbling deer and the blackberry-pecking robins by sowing the place with the excretory scent of the fisher, a diminutive but apparently quite vicious type of weasel.

The online market for the liquid byproducts of wildlife micturition — animal pee, if you’d rather dispense with euphemism-by-obscure-vocabulary — is considerably more, well, voluminous than I expected.

Indeed, more than I could have imagined.

Turns out you don’t need to actually own a wolf — and possess a certain deftness with a catheter — to procure the protective powers of a predator’s urine.

An Internet connection and a credit card will bring the stuff — packed in a well-padded and leak-proof box, one would hope — to your front door.

Which saves time and, probably, a finger or two.

It was pure coincidence that introduced me to the brisk commerce in what’s generally considered a waste product.

Not long after my wife lamented the loss of her tomatoes to the neighborhood mule deer, I happened to hear, on a morning radio comedy program, a reference to “predator pee.”

I sensed a potential solution which would be simpler, albeit more aromatic, than erecting 10-foot fences.

Whether Predator Pee ranks as the most prolific purveyor of this substance I can’t say.

But its competitors would have to go a fair piece to match the Predator Pee website — http://www.predatorpee.com, of course — for sheer entertainment.

When I scroll through the site and try to imagine how it came to be, I envision a group of people sitting around a seedy apartment, tossing around ideas rather like the joke writers for Conan O’Brien or Jimmy Fallon. There’s a laptop on the kitchen table, surrounded by empty beer bottles 

and grease-stained pizza boxes, and occasionally somebody types in an especially comical line.

The humor on predatorpee.com, as you probably have guessed, lands solidly on the juvenile end of the spectrum.

Puns abound.

The best of these is “pee-rimeter” — the pest-free zone you can create by sprinkling the urine of your choice around whatever it is you want to protect.

The company’s motto, as it were, is “Bringing pee to the people since 1986.”

Remember that year the next time someone contends the Reagan era was a repressive time.

The company’s line is not limited to urine. This is something of a relief.

But even the non-pee parts of the catalog involve other animal byproducts.

The company — its official name is Maine Outdoor Solutions — also sells authentic wool crusher hats. So far as I can tell this is the outfit’s only item that involves, or requires, sheep.

Also available is BearGuard, which isn’t what you probably think it is, what with all the previous urine references.

In fact BearGuard is a water-repellent for boots. It is, however, made from “real bear fat.” I don’t doubt this keeps the rain from soaking your socks. But extracting it from the bear must be a more, well, irreversible process than collecting ursine urine. Which, rest assured, is also available if your garden marauders are particularly fearful of bears.

Jokes aside, Predator Pee exemplifies the essential vigor of capitalism, and its existence proves that in a free market pretty much anything can be turned into a profit.

Indeed, these clever iconoclasts from Maine peddle urine as a way to attract as well as repel wildlife.

Pee, the company claims, will lure butterflies, because it’s an essential source of sodium and other vital elements for these graceful flyers.

The website boasts about this with the sort of breathless enthusiasm typical of online marketing, although the insertion of a single word (the one just before “business”) transforms an otherwise predictable sentence:

“We have been in the urine business a long time, but we always get excited when we discover a new use for this incredibly renewable resource!”

You won’t read that at the Harvard Business School.

The ultimate question, of course, is how Predator Pee obtains its raw materials. I’ll leave the details to the website, but suffice it to say the explanation is mundane.

The company does not, as I had hoped, employ a battalion of short people with quick hands who can move fast even while wearing galoshes.

Jayson Jacoby is editor 
of the Baker City Herald.

Sure Signs of Spring: Chicken Wrangling and PeeMan in the Garden

Greetings!

I hope everyone had an enjoyable Memorial Day weekend. We owe a deepest debt of gratitude to those men and women who have fought and died in the fight to keep our great country free. Thank you.

Well, it is 58 degrees out. No worries about getting the air conditioners in any time soon. I haven’t even thought about getting the pool ready(and I am usually ready for it in April!). Spring is definitely taking her sweet time this year. We have had plenty of moisture but sunshine has been a rare commodity. However, certain events of this past weekend are undeniable indicators of Spring’s return(however reluctant) – the 8 chicks were moved out of their “chickubator” and into the hen house.

First day in hen house

First day in hen house

That was the easy part.

New Chicken Run

New Chicken Run

Getting Brown Betty and The Amish Hen into their new spacious digs was a bit more challenging.

It involved some tricky manuevering, some edible motivation, and a little coaxing with a badminton racket, but I am pleased to announce that the girls are now enjoying a much bigger run and spacious hen condominium.

Secondly, last year’s pig sty(R.I.P Stanley)was disassembled and a new, much more luxurious and commodious pen was built in a new location in anticipation of the arrival of 2 piglets.

New pig digs

New pig digs

The environmentally conscious man that I am, I simply couldn’t let all that rich, nutrient filled earth left behind by pig pen #1 go to waste.  So, that is now officially the PeeMan’s garden patch. Since it is mine, and it is hidden  so as not to offend my wife’s aesthetic sensibilities, I get to grow what I want in it, so the corn has been planted and squash and pumpkins will soon follow.

PeeMan's garden

PeeMan’s garden

My daughter has also laid claim to some of the land for her own garden this year and the peas and lettuce have already been planted. As soon as the seeds sprout, the WolfPee will be put around the garden plot to protect the tender shoots from any hungry animals.

Pea trellis

Pea trellis

Well, that just about brings things up to date here at the PeeMan’s farm. I hope it is warm and sunny where you are, and don’t forget to protect your gardens this summer with 100% PredatorPee – Accept no substitutes!

Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan