Of Mice and Lawyers – more wire chewing woes

Well, I have been trying to tell people about this problem for a while now. It seems that some consumers are fed up and have turned to the law to protest the use of tasty soy based wiring in their vehicles. . .

CALIFORNIA — Do you have warning lights and costly car repairs? Rodent damage could be the culprit behind your next break down. A class action lawsuit claims the type of plastic used in new cars could be attracting vermin that eat the wires.

“I never could figure out where the stuff came from until I saw the rat,” said Barbara Olm. On more than one occasion a tiny hitch hiker made a meal out of the wiring in Olm’s 2012 Lexus.

The 84-year-old poisoned one rat in her car, but not before the rodent cause more than $400 in damage. “The mechanic found a ground wire and coolant wire eaten by rats,” Olm said. . . . .

Chewed up insulation is a cheap fix but wiring damage can be costly. “I have seen a couple in the $2000 range,” Campanili said, and damage is not covered under warrantee. University Honda can’t explain what’s attracts rodents to vehicles, but attorney Brian Kabateck can. “The plastic coating around the wires is made of soy,” Kabateck said. “I am not a rat expert, but soy must be delicious to rats.”

“While we cannot comment on this litigation, we can say that rodent damage to vehicle wiring occurs across the industry, and the issue is not brand- or model-specific.” Victor Vanov Corporate Communications Toyota Motor North America

http://www.wcpo.com/money/consumer/dont-waste-your-money/lawsuit-claims-car-wiring-too-tasty-to-rodents

 

 

Car owners across the country are getting into their cars these days, turning the key and finding their engine won’t start. The reason may be hard to believe: an animal ate their car’s wiring.

Now, a class action lawsuit claims millions of Toyota cars, trucks and SUVs contain wiring that is attractive to animals like squirrels and mice. Honda settled a similar suit a few years ago.

Thousands of car owners in recent years have ended up like Woody and Mary Herald, who two years ago showed us how animals chewed through their car’s wiring. “On the ground we found this connector, with six inches of wire on either end of it, that the varmints had chewed into completely,” Woody Herald said.

This new suit claims Toyota uses soy-based wiring, which is environmentally friendly but tasty to animals. . . . . .

http://fox17online.com/2017/02/08/do-animals-think-your-car-wiring-is-tasty/

While taking on the auto giants may be an option, it is likely to take lots of time before something is resolved. In the mean time, what is to be done for the average person who is stuck with a rodent taking up residence in their engine and feasting on their car wires?

 “If you see any evidence of rodents under the hood of your car, you should buy a 384250_f1024repellent immediately, before they cause  hundreds of dollars of damage.  That way, you don’t waste your money.”

 http://fox17online.com/2017/02/08/do-animals-think-your-car-wiring-is-tasty/

Well, I have never been one to bring up a problem without offering a solution.   Our PeeShots are perfect for this application. They come in an 8 pack and are “Pee-Loaded” with PredatorPee. Remove the lids and place the PeeShots near each tire and in engine compartment or other target areas in the vehicle. Remove before driving. Choose BobcatPeeShots for mice, CoyotePeeShots for rats and ‘coons, FoxPeeShots for squirrels, and WolfPeeShots for domestic and feral cats.

Rodents Cause More Than £370m Of Damage Annually To Cars in the UK Alone

Guest Blogger Toby Bateson

Rats are renowned for being highly destructive. They are well known to damage food, clothing and buildings. roof-rat-961499_640They also target machines and computers, including the wiring in your car engine. Repairs can be expensive, sometimes an entire car may need rewiring as a result. For a high end sports car or SUV this can be in the region of £7000.

car-482683_640Research by Hammer Technologies has shown that an amazing 9% of car users in the UK have had their car damaged by rodents at some point. Damage found included chewed pipes, bitten plastic cowling and broken wires and pipes.

The reason they tend to do this is thought to be because their teeth grow constantly throughout their lives. They chew on hard materials such as steel wires in order to wear their teeth down. The warm engines of cars are also thought to attract rats looking for a home.

The survey demonstrated that the average cost of repair came to £300. The total cost of rat damage to cars every year was calculated to be an amazing £377,410,90.

The way this figure was found, if you are interested, is as follows.

In 2013 31 million cars were on the road in the UK, according to official Department of Transport figures. The survey showed an average of 1.86 rat damage events for each person who was affected. Eight of the 33 episodes reported occurred in the previous year.

9% of those surveyed had suffered rodent damage to their cars. The following sum calculates the total cost of the damage. 9% * 31 million cars * £300 * 1.86 episodes per person * (8÷33) episodes in the last year = £377,410,909.

If you have a car make sure you do everything you can to protect yourself. The PeeMan has products which will protect your car from rat damage.  Visit the store  now to get the protection you need.

Tasty Wiring Biting Honda

Greetings from the North Woods,

Almost exactly a year ago I published  “Green” Car Wiring Tickles Rodent Tastebuds on this very blog and what should I stumble across today but more news about exactly how tasty car makers have been making their wiring! So tasty that angry customers are actually starting to sue! The below article from nbcnews.com  details a class-action lawsuit against carmaker Honda. It seems that in the company’s zeal to pursue eco-friendliness, they have made friends of mice and enemies of some of their customers. The damages caused by the rodents can add up to thousands of dollars very quickly. While Honda deals with angry customers, there is a solution for those of you stuck with yummy soy-based products in your vehicles – predator urine. I am not just saying that – Wiley Faris of Arapahoe Autotek is quoted in the article below – “Predator urine  is a good deterrent,” Faris said. “That stuff can take care of the critter damage pretty quick.”

Where do you get predator urine? Predatorpee.com .com of course! Auto mechanics, car dealers, and pest control specialists just like Faris have begun telling their customers about our products, specifically our PredatorPee PeeShots  for vehicles and other indoor applications. They are available with WolfPee, FoxPee, BobcatPee, and Mt. LionPee depending on the particular pest you are trying to deter. So, while you are waiting for your class-action money, protect your car from any further damage with predator urine. urine.

 

Honda’s Soy-Based Wiring Covers Irresistible to Rodents: Lawsuit

Environmentally friendly car wiring with a soy-based coating is too tempting for rodents to resist, according to a federal class-action lawsuit that demands Honda pick up the tab for the damage caused by gnawing mice, rabbits and squirrels.

The breach of warranty lawsuit, filed last week in Los Angeles and first reported by Courthouse News Service, results from the automaker’s quest to “go green” by using soy-based biodegradable wire coating. The coating costs less than plastic but does have a downside, according to lead plaintiff Daniel Dobbs of Wyoming.

In the lawsuit, Dobbs alleged that he had to pay twice to have chewed-up wires in his 2012 Honda Accord replaced at a Honda dealership. The second time, he said, mechanics wrapped the wires in special tape intended to deter rodents, demonstrating that Honda is aware of the issue.

That means car owners should not have to foot the bill for the repairs, argues Dobbs, who was joined by Honda owners in Arizona and Texas in suing Honda.

Peromyscus maniculatus
A deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), seen in an undated photo provided by the National Park Service. d) John Good / National Park Service via AP

“(The automaker) has turned this defective soy-based insulated wiring into another source of income for Honda and its dealers by charging aggrieved vehicle owners for repairs or parts to deal with the adverse consequences …that Honda should have covered under warranty in the first place,” the lawsuit says.

Other car owners not involved in the lawsuit say they have had similar problems.

“I just picked up my 2013 Honda Accord from the dealer with almost $2,000 worth of work completed due to a wood rat eating a main harness,” one dissatisfied driver said on a forum discussing the issue. “Then I find (that) Honda makes a shrink wrap tape specifically for the problem. Are you kidding me!!! Fix it from the start instead of putting the burden on us consumers.”

This isn’t the first time that the use of soy in vehicles has caused problems. In the mid-1940s, in an attempt to spare metal for the war effort, license plates in some states were made from compressed soy beans and fiberboard. Goats and cows were attracted to the vehicles and regularly chewed off the plates completely.

The soy-based wire coating also has been known to be appetizing. In 2013, the Los Angeles Times reported that rabbits had munched their way through soy-based wiring in cars parked at Denver International Airport.

“They come to the recently driven cars for warmth, and once they’re there, they find that many of the materials used for coating ignition cables are soy-based. And the rabbits find that quite tasty,” Wiley Faris of Arapahoe Autotek repair center told the newspaper.

Faris suggested a solution for anyone seeking to prevent their car from becoming a critter snack shack – coating the wires with fox or coyote urine.

“Predator urine is a good deterrent,” Faris said. “That stuff can take care of the critter damage pretty quick.”

Honda did not immediately respond to a request from NBC News seeking comment on the lawsuit.

Pee-blicity! – Juvenile humor & Capitalism

I just recently stumbled upon the article below. Finally! A journalist who actually gets me. Honestly, I couldn’t have asked for a better write up about our company, Maine Outdoors Solutions LLC. My wife and daughters especially enjoyed the “juvenile” humor comment, and “exemplifies the essential vigor of capitalism” is just about the nicest thing anyone has ever said about me.

Thanks so much Jayson!

Enjoy the article . . .I certainly did!

A pressing problem: Which urine protects best?

By Jayson Jacoby/The Baker City Herald September 18, 2015 01:58 pm

Should I douse my wife’s garden with the urine of a wolf or a cougar?

As you can imagine, this conundrum is cutting into my sleep.

Nor are my choices, in the realm of liquid produce protection, limited to apex carnivores.

Maybe I can confuse as well as frighten the tomato-gobbling deer and the blackberry-pecking robins by sowing the place with the excretory scent of the fisher, a diminutive but apparently quite vicious type of weasel.

The online market for the liquid byproducts of wildlife micturition — animal pee, if you’d rather dispense with euphemism-by-obscure-vocabulary — is considerably more, well, voluminous than I expected.

Indeed, more than I could have imagined.

Turns out you don’t need to actually own a wolf — and possess a certain deftness with a catheter — to procure the protective powers of a predator’s urine.

An Internet connection and a credit card will bring the stuff — packed in a well-padded and leak-proof box, one would hope — to your front door.

Which saves time and, probably, a finger or two.

It was pure coincidence that introduced me to the brisk commerce in what’s generally considered a waste product.

Not long after my wife lamented the loss of her tomatoes to the neighborhood mule deer, I happened to hear, on a morning radio comedy program, a reference to “predator pee.”

I sensed a potential solution which would be simpler, albeit more aromatic, than erecting 10-foot fences.

Whether Predator Pee ranks as the most prolific purveyor of this substance I can’t say.

But its competitors would have to go a fair piece to match the Predator Pee website — http://www.predatorpee.com, of course — for sheer entertainment.

When I scroll through the site and try to imagine how it came to be, I envision a group of people sitting around a seedy apartment, tossing around ideas rather like the joke writers for Conan O’Brien or Jimmy Fallon. There’s a laptop on the kitchen table, surrounded by empty beer bottles 

and grease-stained pizza boxes, and occasionally somebody types in an especially comical line.

The humor on predatorpee.com, as you probably have guessed, lands solidly on the juvenile end of the spectrum.

Puns abound.

The best of these is “pee-rimeter” — the pest-free zone you can create by sprinkling the urine of your choice around whatever it is you want to protect.

The company’s motto, as it were, is “Bringing pee to the people since 1986.”

Remember that year the next time someone contends the Reagan era was a repressive time.

The company’s line is not limited to urine. This is something of a relief.

But even the non-pee parts of the catalog involve other animal byproducts.

The company — its official name is Maine Outdoor Solutions — also sells authentic wool crusher hats. So far as I can tell this is the outfit’s only item that involves, or requires, sheep.

Also available is BearGuard, which isn’t what you probably think it is, what with all the previous urine references.

In fact BearGuard is a water-repellent for boots. It is, however, made from “real bear fat.” I don’t doubt this keeps the rain from soaking your socks. But extracting it from the bear must be a more, well, irreversible process than collecting ursine urine. Which, rest assured, is also available if your garden marauders are particularly fearful of bears.

Jokes aside, Predator Pee exemplifies the essential vigor of capitalism, and its existence proves that in a free market pretty much anything can be turned into a profit.

Indeed, these clever iconoclasts from Maine peddle urine as a way to attract as well as repel wildlife.

Pee, the company claims, will lure butterflies, because it’s an essential source of sodium and other vital elements for these graceful flyers.

The website boasts about this with the sort of breathless enthusiasm typical of online marketing, although the insertion of a single word (the one just before “business”) transforms an otherwise predictable sentence:

“We have been in the urine business a long time, but we always get excited when we discover a new use for this incredibly renewable resource!”

You won’t read that at the Harvard Business School.

The ultimate question, of course, is how Predator Pee obtains its raw materials. I’ll leave the details to the website, but suffice it to say the explanation is mundane.

The company does not, as I had hoped, employ a battalion of short people with quick hands who can move fast even while wearing galoshes.

Jayson Jacoby is editor 
of the Baker City Herald.

How to Protect Pets from Coyotes

This face, though strangely beautiful can be the last thing a poor, unprotected pet will see. The coyote can be a vicious predator.

The following story is unfortunately becoming all too common . . .

By Ruth Thompson

December 29. 2015 5:00AM

Coyote attacks Scituate man’s dog, raises concern

Earlier this month, at about 6 p.m., John Norris was fixing the light on the front door of his Cedar Crest Lane home when he heard his dog, Lucy, barking in the driveway behind him.

“I turned and I saw a coyote,” Norris said. “Lucy went to the edge of the driveway and the coyote shot out and grabbed her by the rear and threw her.”

It all happened so fast, Norris said.

As he ran to his injured dog, the coyote took off.

“I was all concerned about Lucy,” Norris said of the 21-pound Australian labradoodle. “She was really badly injured.”

Coyotes are definitely present in Scituate, where Animal Control Officer Kim Stewart reported receiving sighting reports for more than 20 years.

“Heavily wooded areas are more common, but there are very few areas that we do not have reports of coyotes and in fact they are present in virtually every town in Massachusetts,” she said.

There have been a lot of reports of coyotes being aggressive toward pets, Stewart said. . . . Click here to read more of this article

Well, this is scary for pet owners, but what is to be done? Many articles reference fencing, keeping the food inside, making loud noises, or just learning to understand them. I don’t know about you, but I don’t  really want to get to know a coyote, and I certainly  don’t want to share my back yard with one. Now, I make it my business to know predators, and I sell urines(including coyote) to scare off other critters. As soon as I caught wind of this growing problem a few years back, I did some research and confirmed my hypothesis that the coyote has only a few natural predators, one of which is canis lupis, more commonly known as the wolf! I put 2 and 2 together, and now predatorpee.com .com is selling 100% WolfPee  to deter coyotes. We have sold hundreds of bottles. . .but you don’t have to take my word for it. . .

” I was about to get a gun for the coyotes trying to attack my puppy. But I’m not the gun-slinging type. Was chatting with a lady on the hiking trails and she told me about you. can’t remember her name.” -predatorpee.com customer

“…After we bought your WolfPee last year, we did not have any problems with coyotes whatsoever and we thank you for that. New year and we have three cats we must protect. I thank you and will place my large order soon…”   – Margery F. Walpole, MA 

While I am not a cat lover at all, I do have 2 dogs and I understand the connection pet owners have with their pets and the strong desire to protect them. Coyotes aren’t going to just go away, and we’ve got to be able to protect our pets. Wolf urine provides a safe, natural way to do so. No guns, no walking around your yard banging pots, and certainly no attempting to “get to know” your neighborhood coyotes – just the predator-prey instinct put to use. Click here to better understand the predator urine  concept and its application.

Wishing you and Spot or Fluffy or Mittens a happy and safe New Year!

Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan

Coast to Coast Coyote Troubles

Greetings from the Pee Farm!

Well, the weather forecasters are predicting a good ole nor’ easter for tomorrow into Friday. Accumulation forecasts are all over the map. As usual, we will see what actually ends up on the ground when all is said and done.

coyote2smallIn the mean time, before hunkering down for the storm, I thought I would squeeze in a blog post. I know that I have posted about the coyote problem that is facing the nation many times, but it is a nuisance that is not going away, and we still haven’t sufficiently gotten the word out about the usefulness of 100% Wolf Pee in combating this situation. Below are articles from states across the nation that have been written in the past few weeks alone. They vary in tone, but they all recognize the growing threat of the coyote to small pets at the very least. One article mentions that the coyote has become the top predator since the eradication of wolf and mountain lion in some areas. Well, it stands to reason that if the wolf is a step above the coyote in the food chain, the coyote has instinctual fear of its natural predator and that is why even if the coyote has never seen a wolf, wolf urine will scare them. But, I will let you make up your own mind about that . . .

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/02/06/suburbs-should-be-wary-of-the-wily-coyote.html

http://www.keyetv.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/coyotes-spotted-near-round-rock-isd-campuses-15920.shtml

http://www.nj.com/salem/index.ssf/2014/01/new_jersey_coyote_spotted_in_quinton_residents_yard.html

http://www.newsmagazinenetwork.com/2014012744001/pet-corner-coyote-advisory/

 

I received this testimonial in my Peemail box just today . . .

“I have used wolf urine in the past so did a google search for wolf urine as a
deterrent. searched your website also for dispensers as they are hard to find. it
has kept coyotes away from my ducks. Penny”

Until I find more words. . .The PeeMan

How to Prevent Rodents from Chewing Car Wires

Well, the January thaw is in full swing around here with rain and snowmelt continuing. Next week it looks as if old man winter will mount a comeback, but for now I am enjoying not worrying about frozen pipes or ice dams. While it might not be below zero outside, it is still cold enough for rodents to want to come in from outside. An easy to access dry, warm place can be under the hood of your car. We hear from our customers about this problem all the time and we are trying to get the word out . . . 100% PredatorPee PeeShots are the convenient, effective answer to this annoying problem.

On of our customers emailed the following suggestion –

“Someone should tell the NPR ‘Car talk” guys about this, they are always getting calls about cars damaged from rodents, or rodents dying in cars……Christina”

Also, in case you doubt how much of a problem this can be, I found the article below on the website of Sweeney’s Garage –

Rodent Damage = Expensive Repair
Cold this winter? You’re not the only one!

You might be surprised to learn that during these winter months you may have some furry little visitors living under your hood. The warm dark recesses of your car’s engine compartment is an ideal nesting area for rodents. Mice can and will chew through the wiring under your hood leaving you with an expensive repair bill.

One customer complained of a check engine light and a rough running engine. Upon investigation we found a mouse had chewed through the wiring for his fuel injectors.

Another mouse got into a blower motor where he expired. Every time the heater fan was turned on, it made a loud vibration noise. Some signs you might want to look for under your hood include deposits of bird seed, nests made of string, twigs, insulation, fabric and what looks like dryer lint, or funny noises when you turn on your heater.

 

Our PeeShots are perfect for this application. They come in an 8 pack and are “Pee-Loaded” with 100% Original PredatorPee. Remove the lids and place the PeeShots near each tire and in engine compartment or other target areas in the vehicle. Remove before driving. Choose BobcatPeeShots for mice, CoyotePeeShots for rats and ‘coons, FoxPeeShots for squirrels, and WolfPeeShots for domestic and feral cats.

Help us get the word out – call Click and Clack – tell your friends, tell your neighbors – don’t let this happen to them or you.

That reminds me, I should go stick some in the Scout, the boat and the tractor since I startled a fieldmouse a couple of months ago who had made a home in my headlight!

Until I find more words . . . The PeeMan

 

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