Protect Backyard Chickens from Rats

The second in our series on backyard chicken predators will focus on rats. While the barnyard rat, Templeton, in Charlotte’s Web(a book written and based in Maine by the way)is a friend, albeit somewhat begrudging, to Wilbur and the other animals in the fictional farm, the truth is a far cry from that placid arrangement. 0db115c7f5226a9d8f4f9b1f93dad9efRats are a nuisance, to say the least, and in the worst circumstances a great danger to chicks, eggs, even to hens themselves. The danger these rodents pose comes not only from direct attack and carnage but also from often disease ridden droppings that can remain a threat long after the actual rats have gone.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/rat-chicken-pests-how-to-protect-your-chickens-from-rats

So, aside from actually spotting the creatures themselves, how do you identify the presence of rats? Well, their little feet will hardly leave any distinguishable tracks in the midst of coop bedding, etc. If eggs are missing, or chicks or your hens appear to have been attacked but not necessarily killed(they can fight off rats fairly effectively)you might have rats. But, the best way to definitely identify the Rattus rattus(scientist who came up with that name must have been a real genius)is by its droppings. Yep, poop. We talk about pee all the time in this blog, why not poop? I know my eight year old grandson would heartily approve. Anyway, the droppings of a rat can pretty easily be distinguished from that of its smaller cousin the mouse. They are much larger and apparently,  the rat has more of a sense of hygiene than the mouse. So, rather than finding the droppings scattered everywhere, you will more likely find them in groups.

Once you have identified the threat, it is time to take action. Rats love food. So, it is important to always keep food sources contained and free from outside access. Self contained feeders and firmly closed food storage containers are options for this. Once you have shored up your food security, then you must work to keep the rats away from the coop completely. The traditional use of rat poisons can be dangerous to your flock, so this is where a natural, non-pesticidal repellent can be very useful. Enter coyote urine. What? Coyote Urine? How? It might not be the first thing you think of but, a coyote is one of several natural rat predators. Based on our experience and understanding of the predator-prey concept, rats never have to have been within 100 miles of a coyote to possess an instinctual fear of the wily predator. Rats fear coyotes, they sense the coyote is present because of the urine, and they leave your chickens, chicks and eggs alone – it is as simple as that.

Identify, remove food access, set up a pee-rimeter with 100% coyote urine, carefully take care of any droppings, and rest easy.

Until I find more words. . .The PeeMan

Rodents Cause More Than £370m Of Damage Annually To Cars in the UK Alone

Guest Blogger Toby Bateson

Rats are renowned for being highly destructive. They are well known to damage food, clothing and buildings. roof-rat-961499_640They also target machines and computers, including the wiring in your car engine. Repairs can be expensive, sometimes an entire car may need rewiring as a result. For a high end sports car or SUV this can be in the region of £7000.

car-482683_640Research by Hammer Technologies has shown that an amazing 9% of car users in the UK have had their car damaged by rodents at some point. Damage found included chewed pipes, bitten plastic cowling and broken wires and pipes.

The reason they tend to do this is thought to be because their teeth grow constantly throughout their lives. They chew on hard materials such as steel wires in order to wear their teeth down. The warm engines of cars are also thought to attract rats looking for a home.

The survey demonstrated that the average cost of repair came to £300. The total cost of rat damage to cars every year was calculated to be an amazing £377,410,90.

The way this figure was found, if you are interested, is as follows.

In 2013 31 million cars were on the road in the UK, according to official Department of Transport figures. The survey showed an average of 1.86 rat damage events for each person who was affected. Eight of the 33 episodes reported occurred in the previous year.

9% of those surveyed had suffered rodent damage to their cars. The following sum calculates the total cost of the damage. 9% * 31 million cars * £300 * 1.86 episodes per person * (8÷33) episodes in the last year = £377,410,909.

If you have a car make sure you do everything you can to protect yourself. The PeeMan has products which will protect your car from rat damage.  Visit the store  now to get the protection you need.

Ask the PeeMan: CoyotePee vs. Rats

It is Wednesday, the PeeMan’s favorite day of the week! The day when I get to share with the whole world my pee-related wisdom. My wife would say that I do that every day BUT only Wednesday is “Ask the PeeMan” day on the blog. Enjoy!

Q. Hi. I’m pretty much sold, but we live in Chicago and the things come to our yard from the alley.  Question: how does it smell to humans? We want to repel the rats so we can enjoy the patio. And…will it drive my small dog crazy? I honestly don’t care that much, if the rats leave us alone.  Thx for your reply

A. CoyotePee smell dissipates quickly beyond range of the human nose and your dog will just be curious. Here is the link:
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/repel-rats-rat-problems-coyote-urine.html
KJ The PeeMan

*All inquiries posted come from actual people who have emailed the PeeMan

 

 

Ask The PeeMan – Oh Rats!!!

It’s Wednesday again and that means it’s time to Ask The PeeMan! Here are couple of “ratty” questions I have gotten in my PeeMail lately. Enjoy!

Q.  Hi,
My house backs onto a blueberry farm hence I am forever having battles with rats and mice that somehow get into our home.  I see that coyote urine is recommended for rats and bobcat urine is recommended for mice.  Do you recommend using both urines simultaneously (side by side) for both indoor and outdoor use?   Or should I just go with one type and if so, which one?

Thank you.

Philip

A.  Philip,
Rather than having you buy 2 types of urine, start with the CoyotePee and see how it does for both. Here is the link:
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/repel-rats-rat-problems-coyote-urine.html

Q. I have a large macadamia nut tree which the rats love.  They pick the fruit or knock it off.  The tree overhangs my roof.   I have tried traps with banana, peanut butter, tangerines, avocados but they continue to go back to the nuts.  I have even tried the nuts themselves in the traps…no progress.  If I get the coyote pee, should I put it on the roof, hang it in the trees, or apply it some other way?  Thanks for any information you can give me.  I plan to order from you but am unsure of how to do the applications.

A. Spray CoyotePee liberally on the trunk of the tree and ideally also create a “pee-rimeter” back about 20′ feet from the tree.  The goal would be to intercept them before they get overwhelmed by the lure of the food source. See these links for more info:
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/Application-Instructions.html
http://www.predatorpeestore.com/repel-rats-rat-problems-coyote-urine.html

Until I find more words. . .The PeeMan

 

All Natural, Safe Rodent Control – 100% PredatorPee

Hello All! Well, the snowbanks around here are almost as tall as I am, and the mercury is struggling to creep above zero. If I were a rat, mouse, mole or vole, I would certainly want to be anywhere INSIDE! It appears Maine rodents aren’t alone in that – the excerpts below from recent articles highlight problems with vermin from the west coast to across the pond.

Seattle, WA — (SBWIRE) — 12/18/2013 — Pest problems are not just limited to the elimination of the pest, people have to understand that pests such as rodents and mice do a lot more damage than just being a nuisance, rats and mice are notorious for the germs and diseases they spread. Additionally, these pests can also cause structural damage to a house, especially in the attics and crawlspaces. Thus, it is essential that not only the pests are taken care of but proper measures are taken to deal with the damage they might have done to a structure. http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/attic-crawl-space-cleaning-nuisance-rodent-rats-mice-removal-414053.htm

pic courtesy of Yahoo

pic courtesy of Yahoo

Pest controllers have warned that Britain’s sizzling summer caused a huge increase in the number of rats and mice near our homes. The warmest, driest summer since 2006 helped Britain’s rats and mice reproduce in big numbers, according to Rentokil. And with temperatures set to plummet this month, they’ve warned homeowners that these rodents will now be seeking shelter indoors. The summer of 2013 saw lower rainfall than previous years and less flooding, allowing rodents to stay in their burrows longer and have undisturbed periods where populations grew. They now expect rats and mice to cause problems in Britain’s homes after their numbers grew ‘exponentially’. Female house mice can give birth to litters of up to 14 young, as many as ten times a year. David Cross. Head of Technical Training Academy at Rentokil UK, said: ‘Rodents like warmth, quiet and a source of food and as the first cold-snap is set to hit, it is worth following a few simple steps to avoid attracting rodents into your home.’http://uk.news.yahoo.com/pest-control-rats-mice-rodent-infestation-problem-vermin-rentokil-uk-123605184.html#FLdr6o4

Add to this that the EPA and other groups are growing increasingly opposed to the use of traditional rodenticides, and things are looking good for rodents and bad for home owners. Thankfully, we have a safe, all natural solution for your winter vermin problems – 100% PredatorPee! Our satisfied customers have used both our 100% CoyotePee and 100% BobcatPee successfully and safely for years.

But, don’t just take my word for it . . .

“This stuff ROCKS!!! It was the only thing that got rid of the rats that invaded my house in New York. New York rats are not easy to deter but Predator Pee did the trick.” WS

“Our Condo HOA provided us with a list of rat control tips including your site.” Thomas S

“I have been ordering your products for a few years, mainly bobcat and coyote  pee for rats and mice. I used google to find you the first time and I continue to refer customers to you. Thank You…Joyce”

“I heard about bobcat pee pellets through a conversation on facebook, so I googled it and found you. I am getting this for mouse repellant . . . “LaVonne

“The Honda dealer told me about you because rats had chewed alot of wires under my hood two different times now” Cindy rats

“I have ordered and used your products for the last 5 years. I use it to deny deer access to a specific area and to keep rodents out of my camper.” William

Well, I don’t have anything to add to that! Until I find more words . . .The PeeMan

Other related posts: Green Car Wiring

 

PredatorPee Goes to Washington!

Earlier this month the following article by Jule Banville appeared in the Washington D.C. City News. It appears that even urbanites sometimes need predatorpee.

Want to Know How to Get Rid of Rats? Ask the Peeman.

Rats hanging out in cars and eating essential parts is a common enough problem in the District of Columbia. As City Desk previously chronicled, it happens in Adams Morgan. It happens at 15th and U. Kathryn Kailian, an esthetician who lives in Dupont Circle, had to take her car in six times for service because of rat damage. At one point, she submitted a claim for the $1,200 her dealership charged to completely re-wire her vehicle. “Our insurance company dropped us,” she says.

Fed up, Kailian Googled for solutions and found coyote pee. She ordered a bottle of it on the Internet, sprayed it on her engine, and hasn’t had a problem since. One bottle will last her “for years” since she only spritzes every few months. The smell dissipates pretty quickly and the rats have left her alone, despite the fact that she parks in an alley with Dumpsters filled by Five Guys, Chipotle, Cosi, and other delicious-to-rats restaurants.

But how does a seller of coyote piss collect coyote piss?

For the answer, I turn to the self-described “peeman,” Ken Johnson, who has been in the urine business for more than 20 years. Johnson, 57, has a wife, three daughters, and a nice house in Maine, all supported by the sale of animal waste.

He asserts the products at predatorpee.com—whether from wolf, bobcat, fox, or mountain lion—are the real stuff, not synthetic, and not dressed-up dog pee (although dog pee is for sale, too, to help Rags figure out where he should go). How it works is only slightly mysterious.

Johnson has contracts with zoos and wildlife preserves “all over the country” whose employees collect animals’ pee, mostly in drains inside the exhibits. The mysterious part is where these places are. Johnson doesn’t like to get specific. “We’ve run into problems with PETA people,” he says.

His site cautions that all of the suppliers are regulated by state and local agencies and that the animals are treated humanely. He says in a phone interview that no one is pumping them with water or Budweiser to make them go.

Basically, it’s a moneymaker for nonprofits, a moneymaker for Johnson, and a solution for people, like Kailian, who’ve had it. In Florida, coyote pee wards off iguanas. In Japan, wolf pee keeps wild boar out of rice paddies. And for anywhere there are “unwanted people or animals,” Johnson’s newest product is Skunk ‘Em, a proven agent to stop loiterers, he says. What works for what pest depends on the food chain. For example, somewhere inside an urban rat’s brain is a primal fear of a coyote, even though that coyote probably never roamed anywhere near where the rat has ever lived.

As for making his living from piss, the Peeman’s got a healthy sense of humor about it (his daughters, however—ranging in age from 15 to 32—are pretty much mortified). After fielding the question about how he gets the pee more times than he can recall, he created a spot on his site that details “How I Became a Urine Collector” by “P. Catcher.” It runs alongside a testimonial written from the coyote’s perspective.

Trained as a marketer, Johnson acquired the company in 1986 from a former client. Back then, the products were bought primarily by hunters to attract deer. But Johnson started noticing that people in nonrural areas were buying his products—suburban gardeners were an early indication of wider applications.

Then there was the spike Predatorpee got when Dave Barry included bobcat pee in his annual gift guide, which runs in the Washington Post Magazine. “People wanted to buy it for their lawyers, for their ex-wives,” says Johnson.

And then, Al Gore invented the Internet and Predatorpee began flowing like never before.

These days, the urine is sold exclusively online and comes in several forms. A spray bottle of coyote piss runs $25.99, plus S&H.

Johnson has an office/warehouse on his 40 acres outside of Bangor, a good distance form the house. He’s become desensitized, to some degree, to the smell. “Probably more so than my wife,” he says. “She knows when I’ve been working with Skunk ‘Em.”