Even More Words from the Customers

PeeMailI am always astounded at the number of emails that I receive from people all over the country telling us how our product works for them. Now, mind  you, I am not astounded that the product works – that’s a given – I am astounded that people will take the time to write me an email about it. Nevertheless, my PeeMail box just keeps filling up! So, without further ado . . .

“HI, I’ve been looking for something to keep my cute chipmunks out of the blackberries. Several people suggested coyote urine. I googled several sites. Yours looked like the “most authentic” – not sure what I mean. The Amazon site had several products, but they had mixed reviews. Some sites had general “predator urine“. I think I liked that you are in Maine.” – Phyllis

"This is at least my fifth reorder for 16 oz  BOBCATPEE spray. I originally found you about ten years ago by 

internet search (I think it was Google) for “Bobcat urine,” after hearing a comment on radio about bobcat urine being effective in keeping rodents out of the engine compartment. . . .We are in a rural area with an abundance of rats and mice. A few spray shots in the engine compartment of our two vehicles every one to two weeks or so generally keeps them out. When I’m negligent and it goes for several weeks without spraying, I get loaded with juniper tree branches, sticks, and droppings, etc. plus fire hazard and several times in the past, wiring gnawing damage. We also spray the corners of outside doors to hold down night deposits of droppings and ratpee. Aside from that, this is “The Land of Enchantment.” – Stan

“I found you on Google while searching for “predator urine for raccoons”. I’m going camping and heard that this was the best thing to keep the raccoons out of the
camp ground. ” – Athena

“I originally purchased coyote pee at Fleet farm in Minnesota. When I couldn’t find it one year I started ordering it on line. I used Google search engine. Love the product.”  – Mary

“HI THERE, I FOUND OUT BY SEARCHING THE INTERNET ORDERED YOUR PRODUCT AND FOUND IT TO BE
THE BEST STUFF AROUND. HOPE THAT HELPS YOU, THANKS PAULA”

“Hi, found you on google by searching “fisher scent” and you came up. Being from Maine I was psyched to see you are a Maine company. – Kate”

“I have ordered in the past. Found you on the Internet searching for something to keep the coyotes away from my cats. “- Kym

No one says it better than the customer!

Until I find more words. . .

The PeeMan

Want to know what’s eating your garden?

InvaderHello Again!

I was musing about what to write today, and as I traveled the web the thought occurred to me that I am always telling you how to take care of pest problems, but how about helping you identify what pest is causing the damage? Sometimes you may have spotted the pesky creature, but most of our customers seem to be guessing at what lurks in their gardens by night. So I found the following information published on the web by the UMass Amherst Center for Agriculture and I thought I would pass it on. (hyperlinks have been added by me – UMASS Amherst in no way endorses predatorpee.com)

Damage by Wildlife (Vertebrates)
Rabbits, Voles, Woodchucks, Deer, Chipmunks, Squirrels
All eat leaves or fruits of plants in vegetable gardens. Symptoms include:
Large parts of the plant are chewed off
Leaves are nibbled; stems cut
New growth is uniformly nibbled off
Plants are eaten to the ground
Fruits are damaged or removed
To help determine what vertebrate animal is causing the damage, sprinkle a layer of finely ground limestone around the damaged plants and look for animal tracks left in the powder the next day.
Rabbit damage can be identified by foliage that has been nipped off sharply, leaving no ragged edges. Seedlings might be grazed to the ground, and new growth uniformly nibbled off. Look for pea-sized droppings in the vicinity. Rabbits don’t travel far from their burrows or resting places. They feed at dusk, in the night and early morning. They favor tender beans, beets, broccoli, carrots, lettuce and peas. Deer damage can be easily confused with rabbit damage, but usually large parts of plants are chewed off and deer tracks will be evident in the soil.
Voles damage seedlings by chewing leaves and stems. Vole damage can be confused with cutworm damage because voles will move down a row of seedlings eating just the stems and toppling plants. Or, they might nibble only on the leaves. They feed mostly at night. Look for vole tunnels in grassy areas at the edges of the garden. Voles stay close to their tunnels and sometimes tunnel right into the garden. Problems are more likely to occur when vole populations are high.
Woodchucks tend to trample plants as they feed. They feed close to their burrows during the day, especially in mid-morning and late afternoon. Like rabbits, woodchucks seek shelter in weedy areas, stonewalls, brush piles or under porches and outbuildings. They like corn, beans and peas, but will browse on many tender garden vegetables.
Chipmunks and squirrels may develop a taste for fruits, such as tomatoes or strawberries, more often than the leaves of vegetables. Watch your garden in early morning and at dusk for rodent activity.”

Hope this is helpful. Once you identify the pest, make sure to get some all natural, organic 100% PredatorPee – accept no substitutes!

Happy Gardening!

Until I find some more words. . .

The PeeMan

The Voice of the Peeple

Well, I think that I can officially(with great fear and trepidation)announce that Spring has arrived in my neck of the woods. Flowers blooming, birds chirping, and some of the mud starting to dry up are all good indications. However, people are still skiing on Sugarloaf, so not all of Maine has been released from the icy grip of winter.

So, I got this little tidbit in my peemail today, and I thought it was worth passing along. I can tell you our stuff works, but it sounds even better when other people say so, too. So, find below another in the ongoing Don’t Just Take My Word for It series.

“I am a satisfied customer, having purchased the exact same product about 3 years ago. . . I knew I was looking for some predator urine to keep whatever is pooping all over my boathouse, and on my boat, away. The poop is primarily fish scales. This boathouse is in Pickwick, Tn. I used Google, and found your company with a wide selection of products. I didn’t think Bobcats would scare away whatever I had. Some of the coops around here sell bobcat urine crystals. I think it was my preacher who first suggested I look for that. I figured whatever the offenders were would recognize and fear coyotes. I have found that one bottle of coyote spray lasts about a year, but it has all worn off now.”
– George J.

Just another in a long line of satisfied PredatorPee customers.

Have a good one!

The PeeMan

Peeman Takes on Backyard Varmints

Q. I am in central NJ and have backyard varmint problems you can solve. Bears are native nearby – wolves and mountain lions are not. The varmints are groundhogs, wild housecats, and field mice. Is wolf urine what I am looking for?

A. I think CoyotePee would be best for your situation. Just click on coyote urine on our website to get to the CoyotePee page.

Thanks for asking – KJ, The PeeMan